Conventional kibble/ Pet food could be slowly killing your pets

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If you have pets, you probably see them as an extension of your own human family and care for them accordingly. You may even purchase premium pet food in the hope that your furry loved ones will live long, healthy and disease-free lives. But many conventional kibble products, or pet foods that come dried in bags, contain animal by-products, chemical additives and other questionable ingredients that could be slowly killing your pets.

Even the more expensive pet food brands contain some of these questionable ingredients, which include things like leftover animal parts ground up from “4-D” livestock. The 4-D part refers to dead, dying, disabled and diseased animals that are considered unfit for human consumption, and the by-products of these animals are routinely added to pet kibble, unbeknownst to millions of pet owners who think they are feeding their pets premium food products.

“According to the online pet pharmacy, PetMeds, by-products are ‘the leftover parts of the animal that are not suitable for human consumption’ and can include animal pieces such as necks, feet, bones, intestines and lungs,” explains The Screeching Kettle.

Normally, these parts of animals would be nutritious for pets. But because they typically come from factory-farmed animals exposed to tainted feces, heavy metals and other toxins, these additives pose a grave health risk. These same animals are also deliberately fed things like genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) and poultry litter, the latter of which is composed of debris and other waste collected from the floors of chicken cages and broiler houses.

“Poultry litter … is recycled and fed to cows, and often contains not only uneaten chicken feed, but also feces, feathers, heavy metals and even bits of dead rodents,” explains The Screeching Kettle, citing data presented by Consumers Union.

These are obviously things that no loving pet-owner would ever consciously feed to their pets. But because they are hidden in many of the most popular kibble brands, most consumers are unaware of their presence. As a result, millions of people are inadvertently feeding their pets poison, that with regular consumption, can lead to major health problems or even death.

Many pet foods loaded with ingredients that make pets sick

Besides animal by-products, most conventional pet foods are loaded with all sorts of other ingredients that no mammal should ever consume. The Dog Food Project lists ingredients to avoid when purchasing pet food that include things like glyceryl monostearate and food coloring. Many dog food brands that contain fish meat also contain ethoxyquin, a preservative chemical linked to cancer causation.

“They actually believed what commercial dog food companies have said — that it is not good to serve your dog real food,” stated nutritionist and chef Gayle Pruitt, author of Dog-Gone Good Cuisine: More Healthy, Fast, and Easy Recipes for You and Your Pooch, during a recent interview with The New York Daily News.

“To think that dogs should eat out of a can or bag for the rest of their lives, that’s so wrong,” she added, noting that dogs require the same nutrients as humans, which is why they function best on human-grade meat and vegetables.

Many pet foods are also heavily composed of grains like wheat and corn which, besides their potential GM status, are not healthy for pets. Dogs in particular thrive on raw diets composed of healthy meats, fish and vegetables, not processed grains and chemical additives.

 

Action steps – to a healthier PET/ DOG/ CAT

1) Use these lists to analyze the quality of the ingredients in the pet food you’re currently feeding your pets. The first five ingredients listed on any pet food product make up the bulk of the product, so check those first. If you find that these first five ingredients are not high quality ingredients, consider switching to a higer-quality brand of pet food.

2) When shopping for pet food, read ingredients labels and cross-reference them with the lists presented here so that you know which ingredients are truly high-quality vs. those that aren’t.

3) Do not be fooled by claims of “natural” or “wholesome” on pet food product packaging. Virtually any pet food product can claim to be “natural,” even ones that use synthetic petrochemicals that cause cancer. There is virtually no effective regulation of pet food health claims, and pet food manufacturers have learned that making “natural” claims sells more food, even if the food is largely made from dubious ingredients and chemical additives.

4) Watch out for artificial coloring and chemical additives in pet treats. Virtually all pet treats use petrochemical coloring to enhance the visual appeal of their products in order to make them more attractive to the humans who buy them. Such colors, however, are potentially carcinogenic to pets and should always be avoided (read labels and avoid artificial colors like Red 40 or Yellow 2).

5) Never buy pet food in a big-box store, grocery store or convenience stores. These retail outlets typically offer the worst pet food products available today. Only health food stores, natural stores and online retailers offer healthy pet food. (Even pet specialty stores typically only sell junk pet food. Don’t trust the health claims on popular pet food products.)

6) Finally, always augment packaged pet food with real food that you make in your kitchen. The best pet food is the food that you make, using fresh, quality ingredients. Even the best pet food in the world is not a substitute for home-prepared meals for your pets. Avoid feeding your pets refined grains, sugars or other high-glycemic index foods. Stick with fresh meats, vegetables and superfood supplements like kelp or microalgae (spirulina, blue-green algae, etc.)

http://tinyurl.com/AloeAnimals

 

Pet food ingredients listed by best to worst 

The following list of pet food ingredients and ratings was created by a cooperative effort between pet food formulator Dr. Lisa Newman, N.D., Ph.D. , Mike Adams  and the non-profit Consumer Wellness Center ). Mike Adams and the CWC analyzed the ingredients of 448 popular pet food products sold in the United States and organized them by frequency. Dr. Newman then provided a nutritional analysis and comment for each ingredient.

carrots(5 stars)found in 12% of pet food products analyzed
Natural source of beta carotene (precursor to Vitamin A needed for immune function), excellent fiber.

cracked pearled barley(5 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
A nutritive, wonderful grain.

cracked barley(5 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
A nutritive, wonderful grain.

garlic oil(5 stars)found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent antioxidant, antibiotic.

lamb stock(5 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
More nutritious than simple water used for processing can foods, flavoring in dry food.

copper proteinate(5 stars)found in 23% of pet food products analyzed
Best source of copper used, aids in bone formation, iron absorption, protein metabolism, bone formation

ground whole grain sorghum(5 stars)found in 9% of pet food products analyzed
Cousin to millet, very nutritive grain, alkalizing to the body, easy to digest.

ground whole grain corn(5 stars)found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
Contains all nutrients/protein of corn.

cobalt proteinate (source of chelated cobalt)(5 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of cobalt, improves use, needed for B12 synthesis.

rosemary extract and citric acid(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Natural preservatives – citric acid is Vitamin C.

venison meal(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent alternative to standard meats, in concentrated form for more protein pound for pound.

chicken broth(5 stars)found in 17% of pet food products analyzed
Source of flavor, excellent if used instead of plain water for processing can food.

peas(5 stars)found in 7% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of protein/carbohydrates/fiber.

canola oil (preserved with mixed tocopherols)(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of fat for energy, high in omega-3 fatty acids, natural Vitamin E preservative.

canola oil(5 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of fat for energy and healthy coat contains 10% omega 3 fatty acids and half the saturated fat found in other vegetable oils commonly used in pet food.

calcium ascorbate(5 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Buffered source of Vitamin C.

garlic extract(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Concentrated form has more health benefits unless listed at bottom of label which indicates a token use.

borage oil(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of Omega-3 fatty acids.

trace minerals (zinc proteinate)(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Best form of zinc, protects against cell damage and stimulates immune system, but indicates lack of well-rounded supplementation.

turkey broth(5 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Used instead of plain water for processing, more nutritional, flavor enhancing in dry foods.

beef meal(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Dehydrated whole muscle meat, packs more protein pound for pound.

beef broth(5 stars)found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
Used instead of plain water in can foods or as flavoring in dry foods.

chicken meal(5 stars)found in 17% of pet food products analyzed
Concentrated chicken meat, more protein since water weight has been removed. Excellent source of protein for cats, good source for dogs.

mixed tocopherols (a source of natural vitamin E)(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Superior source of natural Vitamin E oils.

lamb broth(5 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Used instead of plain water in can foods, as flavoring in dry foods.

lamb meal(5 stars)found in 10% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent protein source, concentrated-more protein for the money. Less likely to cause allergies, easy to digest.

lecithin(5 stars)found in 7% of pet food products analyzed
A natural antioxidant, very beneficial.

dried peas(5 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Source of protein/carbohydrates/fiber.

mackerel(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of cold water fish, high in fatty acids.

iron proteinate(5 stars)found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent, most expensive source of iron needed for red blood cell reproduction.

manganese proteinate(5 stars)found in 13% of pet food products analyzed
Best source of manganese, necessary to development of strong bones and enzyme activators, enhances immune system.

manganous proteinate(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of manganese, nourishes the nerves and brain. Supports immune and enzyme functions.

dried garlic(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent antioxidant, antibiotic, flea and tick repellent if listed high on the label.

flax seed(5 stars)found in 8% of pet food products analyzed
Whole seeds provide best omega-3 fatty acids and nutritive fiber.

menhaden fish oil(5 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of fatty acids.

dehydrated carrots(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Provides good source of nutritional fiber.

herring oil(5 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of fatty acids.

halibut(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of protein, fatty acids.

oat bran(5 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Aids stool regulation, nutritive fiber.

oat groats(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Oats are very beneficial grains, groat simply has outer fibrous shell off.

oat meal(5 stars)found in 10% of pet food products analyzed
Crushed oat groats, nutritive fiber, good for colon health, balances body’s pH, aids colon health.

ocean fish(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Quality cold water fish, highly nutritious, high in fatty acids.

ocean whitefish(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of protein, fatty acids.

dried carrots(5 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of nutrients and fiber.

dried apples(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Provides good source of nutritional fiber.

ground whole grain barley(5 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of nutrients and dietary fiber is low gluten grain, non-allergenic.

menhaden fish meal(5 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of fish, highly concentrated source of protein and good source of fatty acids..

whole ground wheat(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Is whole ground, very nutritive grain, source of protein, dietary fiber.

zinc proteinate(5 stars)found in 13% of pet food products analyzed
Best source of zinc, protects against free radicals, essential to insulin formation and immune function.

whole sweet potatoes(5 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Nutritive carbohydrates, natural sugars promote energy not hyperactivity.

whole ground brown rice(5 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Is whole ground, very nutritive grain, source of protein, dietary fiber.

whole ground oats(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent grain source, easy on the digestive tract.

whole brown rice(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Whole grain, nutritive.

garlic powder(5 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent antioxidant and antibiotic, more concentrated than plain garlic.

alpha-lipoic acid(5 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Added for healthy skin and coat.

whole ground barley(5 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of nutrients and dietary fiber, is low gluten grain, non-allergenic source of protein.

rosemary extract(5 stars)found in 22% of pet food products analyzed
Natural preservative, concentrated.

whole carrots(5 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of beta carotene, nutrients and fiber.

catfish meal(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of protein, fatty acids but some of the natural oils are lost.

catfish(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of protein, fatty acids.

alfalfa dehydrated meal(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of chlorophyll.

alfalfa concentrate powder(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of chlorophyll.

sun-cured alfafa meal(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Alfalfa meal provides chlorophyll but “sun-cured” a bit gimmicky.

iron amino acid chelate(4 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Better source of iron, improves use, needed for red blood cell production.

white fish(4 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Alternative source of protein.

cod(4 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Good protein alternative.

whitefish(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good alternative to standard meats.

whole wheat(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Nutritionally complete grain, good source of grain protein but often suspected to cause allergies.

copper amino acid chelate(4 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Better source of copper, improves use, needed for iron absorption, bone formation, protein metabolism and blood clotting.

cobalt amino acid chelate(4 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Better source of cobalt, improves use, needed for B12 synthesis.

citric acid and rosemary(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Natural preservatives although citric acid (Vitamin C) can be harsh on digestive tract.

chicken liver, fresh(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates better quality, but can be misleading.

chicken stock(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Better than plain water used for processing canned foods or flavoring dry foods.

oats(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of fiber and energy but not whole ground for full nutritional value.

chicory extract(4 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Concentrated source of innulin, a prebiotic, gimmicky but more effective than plain root or powders.

chicken fat (naturally preserved with mixed tocopherols)(4 stars)found in 19% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of energy and flavor, preserved with Vitamin E, but dogs do better with vegetable and fish oils.

shrimp(4 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of protein.

rosemary(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Natural preservative.

ocean fish meal(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Concentrated cold water fish, highly nutritious, may have oils expressed leaving it lower in fatty acids.

folic acid supplement(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, needed for blood building and DNA synthesis.

preserved with mixed tocopherols(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Natural Vitamin E preservative.

citric acid and rosemary extract(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Common natural preservatives.

herring meal(4 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of protein, poor source of fatty acids as oil is pressed out of fish to make meal.

sage(4 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Natural preservative.

green beans(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of nutrients and fiber.

alfalfa nutrient concentrate(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of chlorophyll, protein and nutrients.

chicken fat(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of energy for cats, dogs do best on oils rather than animal fat.

venison stock(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Better than plain water for processing in can foods, flavor additive in dry foods.

venison(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good alternative to standard meats.

duck(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good alternative protein source, less heavy in water weight than chicken.

veal broth(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Better than simple water for processing in can, used as flavoring in dry foods.

turkey stock(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Better than simple water for processing in can, used as flavoring in dry foods.

beta carotene(4 stars)found in 23% of pet food products analyzed
Source of Vitamin A precursor, aids immune response, allergy control, slows aging.

dried kelp meal(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of iodine for thyroid function and chlorophyll.

ground whole wheat(4 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Whole ground is excellent, but not considered the best grain choice for dogs.

manganese sulfate(4 stars)found in 37% of pet food products analyzed
Better source, manganese is necessary to development of strong bones and enzyme activators, enhances immune system.

venison meat(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good alternative to standard meats.

ground whole peas(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of nutrients and fiber.

tuna(4 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of protein and fatty acids.

pea fiber(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of nutritious fiber.

pearled barley(4 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Not whole ground, less nutritive but a wonderful grain, low gluten and flavorful.

rabbit(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good alternative meat source.

copper amino acid complex (source of chelated copper)(4 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Better source of copper, improves use, needed for iron absorption, bone formation, protein metabolism, blood clotting.

whitefish meal(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good alternative to standard meats in concentrated form for more protein, can have oils expressed.

manganese amino acid chelate(4 stars)found in 10% of pet food products analyzed
Better source of manganese necessary to development of strong bones and enzyme activators, enhances immune system.

pea protein(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of vegetable protein.

rabbit stock(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Better than plain water for processing in can food.

ginger extract(4 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good for digestion if listed high on label, if not, gimmicky.

potassium amino acid complex (source of chelated potassium)(4 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Better source of potassium, balances acid/alkaline balance.

eggs(4 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of protein, free of shell.

garlic(4 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Good antioxidant, antibiotic. IS SAFE TO USE!

yucca schidigera extract(4 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Used to reduce stool odor, concentrated.

zinc amino acid chelate(4 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Better source of zinc, improves use, protects against free radicals, essential to insulin formation and immune function.

postassium sorbate (a preservative)(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Mineral-based mold inhibitor.

potassium citrate(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Source of Potassium.

asparagus(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky.

gelatin(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Filler / binder in can food.

dried cheese(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, poor quality used.

potassium chloride(3 stars)found in 86% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of potassium, balances acid/alkaline levels.

dried cheddar cheese(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, poor quality used.

pantothenate(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Vitamin B-complex factor, aids nervous system and adrenal glands.

DL-methionine(3 stars)found in 34% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of methionine, supports healthy skin and nails, liver activity and immune health.

peppers(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky.

parsley(3 stars)found in 7% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, a natural deodorizer.

parsley flakes(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmick, not enough used for therapeutic response.

dried bacillus licheniformis fermentation extract(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky probiotic to aid digestion, not enough to help and can not stand up to heat processing.

parsley oil(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Natural deodorizer, gimmicky.

parsley powder(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Natural deodorizer, gimmicky.

dried bacillus subtilis fermentation extract(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky probiotic to aid digestion, not enough to help and can not stand up to heat processing.

dried buttermilk(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmick.

dried blueberries(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmick, not enough is used for therapeutic response.

paprika oleoresin(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Natural red colorant.

lettuce(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky.

yellow zucchini(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Usually a gimmick, unless listed high up on the label.

manganese oxide(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of manganese, nourishes brain and nervous system, aids in fat and sugar metabolism.

managanous sulfate(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of manganese.

yucca schidigera(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Used for stool odor control.

malt extract(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Flavor additive, sweetener.

dried paprika(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky.

dried parsley flakes(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Usually a gimmick, used as deodorant.

L-tryptophan(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky amino acid, not enough to help and can not stand up well to heat processing.

locust bean gum(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-nutritive binder / filler in can foods.

dried spinach(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Most nutrition lost in drying / gimmicky.

natural chicken flavor(3 stars)found in 14% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky. Designated as natural, seems better than plain chicken flavor but it’s the same. Unless noted as artificial it’s all “natural” regardless of quality.

dried tomato pomace(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky filler ingredient, not enough nutrients to help and can not stand up to heat processing.

manganous sulfate(3 stars)found in 10% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of manganese necessary to development of strong bones and enzyme activators, enhances immune system.

lentils(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky.

zinc amino acid complex(3 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of zinc, protects against free radicals, essential to insulin formation and immune function.

lactobacillus acidophilus(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky probiotic to aid digestion, not enough to help and can not stand up to heat processing.

dried yam(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Nutritive fiber, less sugar than beets. Can indicate poor animal feed quality.

egg noodles(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky source of carbohydrates.

zinc sulfate(3 stars)found in 32% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of zinc, protects against free radicals, essential to insulin formation and immune function.

A & D3 supplements(3 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Standard Vitamin A and D3 supplements, needed for immune function, eye sight and calcium absorption.

zinc oxide(3 stars)found in 54% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of zinc, protects against free radicals, essential to insulin formation and immune function.

lamb fat(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Source of energy.

enterococcus faecium(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky probiotic to aid digestion, not enough to help and can not stand up to heat processing.

ferrous sulfate(3 stars)found in 74% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of iron, promotes oxygen-rich blood, immune support.

dried sweet potato(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of carbohydrates and fiber, less sugar than beets. Can indicate poor feed quality.

dried cranberries(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, too little is used for therapeutic response in urinary tract.

whole wheat flour(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Whole ground wheat grain, more nutritious but flour is too processed.

dried cheese powder(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky flavor.

niacin supplement(3 stars)found in 12% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, promotes proper digestion, energy production and healthy skin and nerves.

niacin & ferrous sulfate(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Standard niacin and iron supplements.

niacin(3 stars)found in 69% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, promotes proper digestion, healthy skin and nerves.

natural smoke flavor(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmick.

natural poultry flavor(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive source, usually cheaper to use but still “natural”.

natural flavor(3 stars)found in 32% of pet food products analyzed
Standard flavor ingredient. Ask the manufacturer.

natural color(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Harmless additive, non-nutritive.

potassium iodide(3 stars)found in 54% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of potassium, balances acid/alkaline levels.

dried chicken cartilage(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky source of glucosamine, not enough used for therapeutic benefits.

manganous oxide(3 stars)found in 40% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, manganese is necessary to development of strong bones and enzyme activators, enhances immune system.

dried chickory root(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Source of inulin, a prebiotic, gimmicky, not enough used for therapeutic benefit.

yellow squash(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Usually a gimmick, unless listed high up on the label.

inositol(3 stars)found in 26% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, non-vitamin B-Complex metabolizes blood fats.

mineral supplements (zinc sulfate)(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of zinc, but indicates poorly represented profile.

milk(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky.

menadione sodium bisulfite complex(3 stars)found in 35% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of Vitamin K activity, necessary for blood clotting, aids as anti-parasitic for intestinal worms.

iron amino acid complex (source of chelated iron)(3 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of iron needed for red blood cell production.

alfalfa(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Source of chlorophyll, dietary fiber.

dried ginger(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Promotes digestion if listed high enough on label, if not — gimmicky.

marigold meal (source of lutein*)(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmick, not enough can be used in a food (too costly) for therapeutic benefits.

marigold extract (source of lutein)(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky supplement, not enough to help, often listed near end of label.

dried kelp (source of iodine)(3 stars)found in 8% of pet food products analyzed
Industry standard source of iodine.

oat fiber(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Non-nutritive filler.

wild rice(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, but more nutritious than white.

fructooligosaccharides(3 stars)found in 8% of pet food products analyzed
Mostly used as gimmick, prebiotic to aid digestion.

thyme(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky.

thiamine mononitrate (source of vitamin B1)(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of B1, needed for healthy nervous system and mental attitude.

thiamine mononitrate(3 stars)found in 93% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of B-1, effects nervous system and mental attitude.

thiamine(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Standard vitamin B-1, effects nervous system and mental attitude.

green tea(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, not enough used for therapeutic response unless listed higher on label.

barley grass(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky additive for dietary “greens,” not enough used for nutritional benefits unless listed high on the label.

taurine(3 stars)found in 39% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, necessary for cats who do not manufacture taurine on their own, helps regulate nervous system, promotes thyroid and cardiovascular health. Some benefit to dogs.

barley(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Excellent source of nutrients, great grain for pets, but not “whole ground.” Can be of any quality.

canthaxanthin(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
A pink colorant from mushrooms, crustaceans, fish.

sweet potatoes(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Good alternative to regular potatoes provides carbohydrates for energy, nutrients, less sugar than beets.

cheese powder(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky.

sunflower oil (preserved with mixed tocopherols)(3 stars)found in 10% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, cheap source of fat for energy, healthy coat, naturally preserved.

tomato flakes(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky.

ground flax seed(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Is not “whole” ground, just flour that might be lacking in fatty acids.

carrot powder(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap source of carrot fiber.

ginger(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Aids digestion if listed high on label, if not, it’s a gimmick.

spirulina(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky ingredient, not enough to help unless listed high up on label.

spinach(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Usually a gimmick, unless listed high up on the label.

spearmint(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky.

preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid(3 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Natural Vitamin E and Vitamin C preservatives.

soybean oil(3 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Source of fat for energy, healthy coat. Dogs do fine.

deboned lamb(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Lamb meat is filled with water, less protein, deboned misleads as to higher quality.

soybean meal(3 stars)found in 13% of pet food products analyzed
Dogs can not digest soybeans, can bloat/die. Good source of protein and fiber for cats.

carmine(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
A crimson pigment made from insects.

bifidobacterium longum(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky probiotic to aid digestion, not enough to help and can not stand up to heat processing.

vitamin B12 supplement(3 stars)found in 86% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, involved in immune response.

beef (natural source of glucosamine)(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, not enough available to be therapeutically beneficial, plus it’s full of water weight, gets it listed high on the label but robs dry food of meat protein, fine in can food.

vitamin B-12(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, involved in immune function.

vitamin A supplement(3 stars)found in 54% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of A, vital to immune function, develops strong eyes and bones, lowers risk to cancer.

vitamin A acetate(3 stars)found in 27% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, needed for immune function.

vitamin A(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Standard supplement needed for a strong immune system.

vitamin E(3 stars)found in 95% of pet food products analyzed
Antioxidant used as food preservative.

beef flavor(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Usually a broth to improve palatability.

beef liver(3 stars)found in 13% of pet food products analyzed
Source of iron and flavor, too much beef liver can become toxic to the body — avoid it in dry foods, safe in can foods as secondary, flavor ingredient.

veal(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Alternative to standard beef.

calcium pantothenate(3 stars)found in 60% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of a B-complex vitamin B5, supports adrenal activity.

glucosamine hydrochloride(3 stars)found in 10% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, not enough can be available to be effective, often listed low on the label as token ingredient. Cooking may effect it’s potency.

calcium iodate(3 stars)found in 41% of pet food products analyzed
Source of iodine, promotes strong bones, teeth, cardiovascular health and skeletal strength.

bifidobacterium pseudolongum(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky probiotic.

tuna meal(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
A source of protein but lower in fatty acids.

tricalcium phosphate(3 stars)found in 13% of pet food products analyzed
Anti-caking agent, emulsifier and dietary supplement of Phosphorous needed for body’s alkaline/acid balance.

bifidobacterium thermophilum(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky probiotic to aid digestion, not enough to help and can not stand up to heat processing.

watercress and spinach(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky unless listed high on the label.

biotin(3 stars)found in 96% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source to promote healthy skin and coat.

blueberries(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, not enough used for benefit to eyes.

glucosamine(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, not enough can be available to be effective, often listed low on the label as token ingredient. Cooking may effect it’s potency.

basil(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky.

calcium carbonate(3 stars)found in 40% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of calcium, promotes strong bones, teeth, cardiovascular health and skeletal strength, used as a buffer to acidic foods.

celery(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmick.

water cress(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky.

whole eggs(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of protein, but includes shell which is not well digested.

whey(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Milk protein, indicates a cheaper food low in meat protein.

soya oil(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Soya is “Soybean,” why hide the fact? It is not the best oil for fatty acids and a cheaper one to use than other vegetable oils like canola.

clove bud oil(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky.

riboflavin supplement(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Vitamin B-2 needed for rich red blood cell production.

riboflavin (source of vitamin B2)(3 stars)found in 92% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, necessary to energy production, fat and carbohydrate metabolism.

red peppers(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky.

copper sulfate(3 stars)found in 76% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, aids in bone formation, iron absorption and protein metabolism.

ground whole grain wheat(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Whole ground is more nutritious, good source of protein, fiber but “grain” indicates feed-grade.

whole cranberries(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, not enough can be used for therapeutic benefit.

vitamin D-3(3 stars)found in 84% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, aids calcium and phosphorous in building bones and teeth.

pyridoxine hydrochloride (source of vitamin B6)(3 stars)found in 80% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, immune stimulant, major factor in protein metabolism and red blood cell production.

corn oil(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Source of vegetable fat.

fish broth(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive, but better that plain water for processing in can foods.

poultry giblets(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descript waste.

whole garlic cloves(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Has anti-carcinogenic and antibiotic action, but not concentrated.

cranberries(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, not enough used in food to help the urinary tract.

cranberry powder(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky ingredient can not contain enough in food to be therapeutically beneficial.

D3(3 stars)found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, aids calcium and phosphorous in building bones and teeth.

D3 and E supplements(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Standard supplements.

deboned chicken(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Chicken meat is filled with water, less protein, deboned can be misleading as to higher quality.

potato fiber(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler.

potato(3 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
A carbohydrate source, can use as cheap filler, can cause weight gain and digestive upset.

potassium sorbate (a preservative)(3 stars)found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
A mold and yeast inhibitor. Mineral-based mold prohibitor.

corn germ meal(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Protein filler, whole corn is best.

chicken liver(3 stars)found in 15% of pet food products analyzed
Source of iron, necessary for red blood cell production, and flavor. Too much liver can be toxic.

soy protein isolate(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Dogs can not convert soy protein to useable fuel, fine in diet for cats. Meat protein is best.

soy protein concentrate(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Protein extracted form soy seed, dogs can not convert soy to protein. Meat is best protein for dogs and cats.

soy lecithin(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Natural antioxidant, often used with rendered animal fat as emulsifier.

chicken (natural source of glucosamine)(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, not enough available to be therapeutically beneficial, plus it’s full of water weight, gets it listed high on the label but robs dry food of meat protein, fine in can food.

bacillus subtilis(3 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky probiotic to aid digestion, not enough to help and can not stand up to heat processing.

chicken cartilage (natural source of glucosamine)(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, not enough is present for therapeutic response.

sodium selenite(3 stars)found in 67% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of selenium, powerful anti-oxidant protects the body from free radicals and heavy metals, supports immune response.

cobalt carbonate(3 stars)found in 21% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of cobalt, improves use, needed for B12 synthesis.

chicken giblets(3 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
By-product, source of protein, flavor.

citric acid(3 stars)found in 18% of pet food products analyzed
Vitamin C, immune stimulant, antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic.

folic acid(3 stars)found in 80% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, needed for blood building and DNA synthesis.

chicken liver flavor(3 stars)found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
Common food enhancer used, especially in cans.

sodium caseinate(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Used as a texturizer in cheap can food.

cinnamon(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky.

B-12(3 stars)found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, involved in immune response.

chicken, fresh(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Chicken contains 84% water weight which robs the protein value from food but gets chicken listed high on label.

choline chloride(3 stars)found in 88% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source of choline, emulsifies fats.

chondroitine sulfate(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, not enough used for therapeutic response — too costly.

chondroitin supplement(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, not enough used for therapeutic response — too costly.

chondroitin sulfate(3 stars)found in 10% of pet food products analyzed
Mostly used as gimmick, too expensive to use enough in food for therapeutic response.

chicken fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid)(3 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of energy and flavor, preserved with Vitamin E and C, but dogs do better with vegetable and fish oils.

folic acid pyridoxine hydrochloride(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap source of folic acid.

fish oil (source of omega fatty acids)(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descript source of fish oil. Often of poor quality.

fish meal (source of fish oil)(2 stars)found in 16% of pet food products analyzed
Poor source of fatty acids (the oil has been pressed out), non-descriptive source indicates poor quality used.

flaxseed meal(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Flax oil has been pressed out of seed to make meal, poor source of fatty acids, cheap way to list flaxseed.

garlic flavor(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, non-nutritive feature.

fish meal (source of dha)(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descript source of fish, low in fatty acids as meal often has the oil removed from it.

fumaric acid(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Used in dry food as cheap preservative.

flax meal(2 stars)found in 9% of pet food products analyzed
Poor source of fatty acids, oil has be pressed out.

fresh chicken(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Contains 84% water in the muscles, adds weight to dry food, less protein nutrition! Best used in can food.

fish meal (natural source of glucosamine)(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmick, not enough glucosamine provided to have therapeutic benefits, fish meal indicates cheap, rancid “fish”.

fish meal(2 stars)found in 8% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive source of protein, low in fatty acids (the oil is pressed out), indicates poor quality, rancid fish are often used.

brown rice(2 stars)found in 7% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler, does not have to be whole ground when used in dry foods! Usually found whole in cans.

chicken liver digest(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Poor quality flavoring, can be rendered by chemical process.

chicken by products (organs only)(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor quality diet, can contain rancid, diseased part, tumors, etc.

chicken(2 stars)found in 57% of pet food products analyzed
Contains 84% water in the muscles, adds weight to dry food, less protein nutrition! Best used in can food.

casein(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Principle protein in cow’s milk. Indicates cheap food, used to compensate for heavy grain use.

carrageenan gum(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler/binder in can foods.

carrageenan(2 stars)found in 11% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap binder/filler in can foods.

canola meal(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Oil (fatty acids) has been pressed out of seed. Cheap source of ‘canola.’

corn flour(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Can create bowel distress, weight gain, source of protein, filler.

brown rice flour(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Not “whole” ground, cheap filler.

copper oxide(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Inexpensive, difficult to assimilate.

broccoli(2 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Nutritious but can lead to gas. Very gimmicky.

beef & bone meal(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Bone meal is difficult to digest (the body does not assimilate it as calcium), cheap source of protein in poor quality product. Can be 4-D source.

beef(2 stars)found in 17% of pet food products analyzed
Contains water in the muscles, adds weight to dry food, less protein nutrition! Best used in can food.

beans(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive, added for cheap protein/fiber/ filler.

barley malt flour(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Waste product of brewing industry, sweetened for flavor, can be used as filler, stripped of nutrients.

bacon(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, pork’s not great for pets.

ascorbic acid(2 stars)found in 34% of pet food products analyzed
Vitamin C — this form can be harsher on stomach, anti-oxidant/immune stimulant, food preservative.

argenine(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Amino acid added to grain-based foods, instead of using more meat protein.

calcium phosphate(2 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Used to improve/stabilize dry foods, inexpensive mineral supplement.

dried chicken stock(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor animal feed quality.

dried vegetable fiber (carrots)(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of fiber but indicates pet food quality not human quality.

dried potatoes(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor quality, cheap filler.

dried liver digest(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor animal feed quality.

dried green beans(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, poor animal feed quality.

dried eggs(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap source of protein, waste product of egg industry, free of shell.

dried egg product(2 stars)found in 38% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap source of protein, waste product of egg industry, free of shell.

dried egg powder(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap source of protein, waste product of egg industry, free of shell.

dried egg(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor animal feed quality.

citrus pectin(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Too acidic for pets. Used more as fiber.

dried citrus pulp(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Citrus is too acidic for pets.

copper(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descript, indicates oxide form, harder to absorb.

dried chicken liver(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor animal feed quality.

dehydrated potatoes(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor animal feed quality.

dehydrated alfalfa meal(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor animal feed quality.

dehydrated alfalfa(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor animal feed quality.

deboned turkey(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Contains water in the muscles, adds weight to dry food, less protein nutrition! Best used in can food.

corn meal(2 stars)found in 11% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler, used as protein source.

corn bran(2 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Mostly a filler.

egg pieces(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor animal feed quality.

dried cooked turkey(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor animal feed quality.

turkey (natural source of glucosamine)(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, not enough is available for therapeutic response. Turkey meat is heavy in water – listed high up on label but does not provide enough protein, indicates food high in grain protein.

potato starch(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler, can cause digestive upset and weight gain.

potassium iodine(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Source of iodine, may cause allergies.

trace minerals (copper sulfate(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, but indicates lack of well-rounded supplementation.

pork broth(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Generally indicates poor quality food.

philloquinone (vitamin K1)(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Unusual source of Vitamin K.

trace minerals (zinc oxide)(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, but indicates lack of well-rounded supplementation.

pasta (durum semolina enriched with thiamine mononitrate)(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap, gimmicky filler uses remnants of pasta making industry.

trace minerals (zinc sulfate)(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Standard zinc source, protects against cell damage and stimulates immune system, but indicates lack of well-rounded supplementation.

malted barley flour(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Sweetened for flavor, can be used as filler, stripped of nutrients.

pasta (durum flour)(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap, gimmicky filler uses remnants of pasta making industry.

tomato pomace(2 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Mostly used as gimmick, not enough nutrition is available to make a difference, can be too acidic on digestive tract causing upset.

rice protein concentrate(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive, probably white rice, dietary protein is best derived from meat source.

non-fat yogurt(2 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, indicates source of probiotics but not enough is used to be effective and can not stand up to heat processing.

monocalcium phosphate(2 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Buffer, neutralizing agent in flours, poor source of phosphorous.

mixed vegetable fiber (carrots)(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Good source of fiber but indicates pet food quality not human quality.

minerals (calcium chloride)(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Is often used to melt ice but effective as diuretic and urine acidifier, shows a very narrow mineral profile.

menadione (vitamin K3)(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Limited source of Vitamin K activity.

venison liver(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Source of iron, flavor but too much liver in dry food can become toxic to the body, fine in can as flavoring.

vitamin B12 and D3 supplements(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates lack of well rounded supplements aids immune function and encourages calcium and phosphorous to build bone and teeth.

turkey(2 stars)found in 12% of pet food products analyzed
Contains water in the muscles, adds weight to dry food, less protein nutrition! Best used in can food.

steamed bone meal(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive source, bone meal is a hard to digest and assimilate source of phosphorous and calcium, they also get protein from this source.

sodium propionate(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Chemical used to prevent mold and fungus, indicates poor quality food.

sodium metabisulfate(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Inorganic salt which retards bacteria found on rancid meat.

sodium silico aluminate(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Chemical used as anti-caking product.

sodium ascorbate (source of vitamin C)(2 stars)found in 12% of pet food products analyzed
Buffered with salt, Vitamin C is vital to immune function.

sodium alginate(2 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Thickener, stabilizer in can foods.

selenium(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descript, can indicate poor quality.

salmon oil(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
May contain higher levels of mercury than other fish oils.

salmon broth(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Better than plain water for processing can food but can contain mercury.

trace minerals (calcium sulfate(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Standard source, but indicates lack of well-rounded supplementation.

lamb tripe(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Intestines, not best source of protein.

tomatos(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Mostly used as gimmick, not enough nutrition is available to make a difference, can be too acidic on digestive tract causing upset.

sufficient water for processing(2 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Cheapest, non-nutritive filler in can food, should use a meat broth instead.

sunflower meal(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, all the oil (fatty acids) has been pressed out of seed.

pysllium(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can be too harsh on digestive system, usually gimmicky.

sunflower oil(2 stars)found in 7% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, source of fat for energy, healthy coat, not preserved.

sweet potato powder(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates waste product, filler.

tapioca starch(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler and binder.

textured vegetable protein(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates food low in animal proteins, cheap additive/filler.

tomato paste(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky can be too acidic for some pets, especially dogs, not enough used for good nutrient content.

pasta(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Pure starch can cause digestive upset and weight gain — gimmicky filler.

rye(2 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Very harsh grain to digest. Pets usually don’t like it.

gum arabic(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler/binder used in can foods.

ground wheat flour(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Not “whole” ground, misleading indicates poor quality – causes digestive upset, allergies and feeds arthritis.

L-carnitine supplement(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
This amino acid (to build muscle) is not needed unless it’s a poor quality of meat used or high grain content food.

lamb(2 stars)found in 11% of pet food products analyzed
Contains 70% water in the muscles, adds weight to dry food, less protein nutrition! Best used in can food.

L-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (a source of vitamin C)(2 stars)found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap, feed-grade source of Vitamin C, used as supplement, non-assimilated.

L-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate(2 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap, feed-grade source of Vitamin C, used as supplement, non-assimilated.

L-arginine(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Alkaline amino acid added to poor quality foods to excrete urea.

ground wheat(2 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Not “whole” ground, misleading indicates poor quality – causes digestive upset, allergies and feeds arthritis.

guar gum(2 stars)found in 31% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap, non-nutritive filler in can foods.

L-carnitine(2 stars)found in 16% of pet food products analyzed
Supplements poor meat source diets, a B-vitamin factor naturally found in meat, important in regulating fat metabolism.

lamb liver(2 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Used as flavor, source of iron, but too much liver in dry foods can become toxic to the body, fine in can food when it’s not a primary ingredient.

lamb digest(2 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Used as flavoring in poor quality foods, rendered lamb parts.

whole grain corn(2 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Contains all nutrients of corn but indicates the use of feed-grade (old, moldy), not human-grade (healthier, fresher), can cause allergies, weight gain, blood sugar imbalances.

whole grain wheat(2 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Contains all nutrients of wheat but indicates the use of feed-grade (old, moldy), not human-grade (healthier, fresher), can cause allergies.

wheat(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor feed-grade quality, causes allergies and digestive upset. Not whole ground.

iron sulfate(2 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Poor source of iron.

ground yellow corn(2 stars)found in 8% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates feed-grade source of protein/filler, not “whole” ground.

ground psyllium seed(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Aids in stool formation but can be too harsh on digestive tract.

lycopene(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, not enough used for therapeutic response unless listed higher on the label.

L-lysine(2 stars)found in 8% of pet food products analyzed
Source of Lysine (essential amino acid found in meat), needed to use for food enrichment for grain-based foods.

lutein(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky, not enough used for therapeutic response unless listed higher on the label.

xanthan gum(2 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap binder, filler in can foods.

wheat germ meal(2 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Often added in cheap foods to wheat to balance grain and add protein, cheaper that using whole grain.

chicken by-products (organ meat only), fresh(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can be poor quality hidden behind “organ meat only” and “fresh” still by-products which can include diseased organ tissue, tumors.

animal fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols)(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descript source, often rancid to begin with, regardless of natural preservative use afterwards, misleading.

caramel color(1 stars)found in 11% of pet food products analyzed
Sugar-based or can be prepared by ammonia process associated with blood toxicity in lab rats.

caramel(1 stars)found in 9% of pet food products analyzed
Sugar-based adds to hyperactivity, or can be prepared by ammonia process associated with blood toxicity in lab rats.

animal fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid)(1 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive fat! Can be anything rancid or 4-D (dead, dying, disabled, diseased) regardless of natural Vitamin E and C preservatives. Misleading.

yellow 5(1 stars)found in 7% of pet food products analyzed
Artificial color, a salicylate which can be become deadly to cats with extended use.

yellow 5 and other color(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Possible carcinogens.

tallow(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Causes poor health, disrupts digestion, can include rancid restaurant grease. Very bad fat source!

animal fat (preserved with vitamin E mixed tocopherols)(1 stars)found in 10% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive, cheap animal source, often rancid prior to preserving with Vitamin E (gimmicky to cover poor quality fat).

yellow 6(1 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Artificial color, potentially carcinogenic food colorant.

tetra sodium pyrophosphate(1 stars)found in 7% of pet food products analyzed
Is a rust stain remover used in cleaning products (TSP)!!!! Why is it in food? Emulsification of rendered animal fats! Very toxic, causes nausea and diarrhea.

animal fat (preserved with vitamin E)(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive source indicates 4-D fat, regardless of “natural” preservative it is rancid, often from diseased tissue. Misleading to be preserved with vitamin E.

cane molasses(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
SUGAR!!! Leads to weight gain, hyperactivity and feeds arthritis, best used in treats, not supplements or foods.

sodium tripolyphosphate(1 stars)found in 9% of pet food products analyzed
Used as rancid meat preservative.

calcium sulfate(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Plaster of Paris! Firming agent.

soy hulls(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can cause bowel irritation, cheap filler.

animal fat(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive source indicates 4-D fat chemically preserved, difficult to digest, potentially carcinogenic.

soybean hulls(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler, harsh on intestines.

soy flour(1 stars)found in 8% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap source of grain protein, filler, can cause bloat/death in dogs.

cellulose powder(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Harsh on bowels, suspected to include recycled cardboard.

sorbitol(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Sweetener and binder.

chicken by-product meal(1 stars)found in 23% of pet food products analyzed
Ground up carcasses, internal organs, beaks, feet. Concentrated.

sorbic acid (a preservative)(1 stars)found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
A mold and yeast inhibitor.

animal fat (preserved with BHA/BHT)(1 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive fat source, indicates 4-D source chemically preserved with carcinogens.

starch(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Cheapest form of carbohydrates causes weight gain and poor digestion, filler.

yeast culture(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Flavoring, source of protein, potentially toxic to the liver.

sucrose(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Sugar –leads to hyperactivity, addiction to food (sugar rush), weight gain.

animal digest(1 stars)found in 13% of pet food products analyzed
Rendered, by chemical and/or enzymatic process, non-descriptive animal tissues used for flavor.

sugar(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Sugar?!! Leads to diabetes, hyperactivity and obesity. Can feed arthritis. BAD.

soybean mill run(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
This is the sweepings off the floor-cheap filler, poor source of protein.

cellulose(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Harsh on bowels, suspected to include recycled cardboard. Can also be crushed peanut hulls.

turmeric(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Gimmicky spice to aid digestion.

whole rice(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor quality white rice which can cause diabetes in dogs.

beets(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Implies whole beet is more nutritious than beet pulp alone but still contains sugar which can lead to weight gain, diabetes, hyperactivity.

beet pulp (sugar removed)(1 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Fiber/filler, stills contains enough sugar for rush/addiction to food and hyperactivity.

bacon flavors(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Does not say “natural” so it’s possibly artificial, can be a carcinogen.

beet pulp(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Sugar-filled fiber/filler, can lead to hyperactivity and diabetes. Can be addicting to some pets.

beef tallow preserved with mixed-tocopherols (source of vitamin E)(1 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Beef tallow can be used restaurant fat! Misleading with “natural” Vitamin E preservative added. Indicates very poor quality product.

beef tallow preserved with BHA and mixed-tocopherols (source of vitamin E)(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Terrible source of fat, chemically preserved with potential carcinogen but uses “Vitamin E” to mislead consumer. Indicates very poor quality product.

BHA (a preservative)(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Chemical. Highly carcinogenic preservative.

beef tallow(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Tallow, includes old restaurant grease, is very hard to digest, leads to diarrhea, premature aging.

wheat middlings(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Sweepings off the floor causes allergies and digestive upset.

wheat gluten(1 stars)found in 28% of pet food products analyzed
Poor protein source, used as a cheap, non-nutritive filler — causes allergies.

vegetable oil(1 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive source of fat, contains saturated fat which is hard on the body, causes premature aging.

venison by-products(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Contains all meat not fit for human consumption, diseased organs, tumors, promotes premature aging.

beef by-products(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Can include any internal part of the cow other than the meat, often from 4-D, rancid sources.

wheat flour(1 stars)found in 18% of pet food products analyzed
Poorly digested filler, can cause allergies and bowel problems.

water(1 stars)found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
Used as non-nutritive filler in food. UGH!

water sufficient for processing(1 stars)found in 10% of pet food products analyzed
Robs protein from can food since it is used as non-nutritive filler instead.

wheat bran(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor quality food, can cause allergies, best to have whole wheat.

beef tallow (preserved with BHA)(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
One of the worse kinds of fat, chemically preserved with potential carcinogen. Often produces allergies.

brewers dried yeast(1 stars)found in 34% of pet food products analyzed
Waste product (used for flavoring, protein, B-vitamins) which can become very toxic to the liver causes allergies and arthritis.

thiamine hydrochloride(1 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Cheapest, poorly assimilated source of Thiamine, Vitamin B-1, needed for nervous system and mental attitude.

titanium dioxide(1 stars)found in 7% of pet food products analyzed
Potentially carcinogenic artificial color used as white pigment.

titanium dioxide color(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Potentially carcinogenic artificial color used as white pigment.

calcium chloride(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Used as a source of calcium but can cause digestive upset, heart issues.

Chicken by-product(1 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Ground up carcasses, diseased internal organs, beaks and feet.

artificial flavor(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can become carcinogenic. Produces allergies.

wheat starch(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Poor carbohydrate source causes allergies.

turkey by-product meal(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can include carcass, feet, beaks and diseased turkey organs, tumors.

brewers yeast(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Waste product (used for flavoring, protein, B-vitamins) which can become very toxic to the liver causes allergies and arthritis.

calcium propionate (a preservative)(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Chemical. Potentially carcinogenic, antifungal.

brewer’s rice(1 stars)found in 31% of pet food products analyzed
Waste product from breweries, cheap, non-nutritive filler can be harsh on intestines and lead to diabetes.

trace minerals (potassium chloride)(1 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Source of potassium to balance pH, small intestinal ulcers may occur, indicates lack of well-rounded supplementation.

bone meal(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-digestible source of calcium can lead to digestive upset. Can be from 4-D sources.

trace minerals (sodium tripolyphoshate)(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap, potentially harmful source of phosphorous indicates lack of well-rounded supplements.

blue 2 and other color(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Carcinogenic.

blue 2(1 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Carcinogenic, artificial color.

wheat mill run(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Sweepings off the floor, causes allergies, digestive upset and feeds arthritis, leads to premature aging.

sodium phosphate(1 stars)found in 9% of pet food products analyzed
Non-digestible source of phosphorous (vital to maintaining acid/alkalinity pH).

brewers yeast extract (saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation solubles)(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Liquid left over from brewery process, condensed. Can become toxic to the liver.

natural and artificial chicken flavor(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Artificial flavors can cause severe illness, become carcinogenic.

manganous oxide calcium iodate(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Often used in bleaching tallow.

maple syrup(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Sugar, causes weight gain, hyperactivity, feeds cancer and arthritis, should not be used in food or supplements, only treats.

meat and bone meal (natural source of calcium)(1 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive indicates 4-D meat, cheapest source, can include diseased tissues plus bone meal can not be digested and assimilated as calcium!

dried grape pomace(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Grapes can be deadly to dogs.

meat and liver meal(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can include tumors and diseased tissues, rancid trim pieces and liver of various animals, concentrated.

meat by-products(1 stars)found in 18% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive indicates 4-D meat, cheapest source, can include diseased tissues (tumors) and organs.

menadione dimethylpyrimidinol bisulfite (source of vitamin K activity)(1 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Least beneficial source of Vitamin K activity needed for proper blood clotting.

modified food starch(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descript source can be from any grain, causes allergies, weight gain and poor digestion, filler.

modified starch(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap source of carbohydrates, filler, causes digestive upset.

peanut hulls 10.8% (source of fiber)(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can harm the digestive tract, cheap fiber.

monosodium phosphate(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Used as emulsifying agent.

lysine(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates heavy soy-based food which dogs can die from unless they have lysine to help digest it, best to avoid this diet unless soy is missing.

natural and artificial flavors(1 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Poor quality of flavor additive, artificial flavors can be carcinogenic.

onion extract(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Onions can be deadly to dogs.

onion powder(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Can be deadly to dogs, non-nutritive.

dried cellulose(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Very harsh on digestive tract, suspected to include cardboard or peanut hulls.

partially hydrogenated soybean oil(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cases digestive upset, premature aging.

dried capsicum(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cayenne powder, can burn stomach.

dried brewers yeast(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can become toxic to liver, waste product of beer and ale industry.

dried beet pulp (sugar removed)(1 stars)found in 25% of pet food products analyzed
Waste product. Cheapest, most common filler used, still contains enough sugar residue to cause problems such as hyperactivity and blood sugar imbalances.

dried beet pulp(1 stars)found in 10% of pet food products analyzed
Waste product. Cheap filler/fiber-causes sugar rush/addiction to food, hyperactivity and allergies.

rice hulls(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler, can be harsh on intestines.

molasses(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Added to foods or high on the list of supplements creates blood sugar imbalance, causes diabetes, hyperactivity, best used in treats, not foods or supplements.

L-alanine(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Non-essential amino acid used as supplement in heavy grain-based foods but causes cancer in lab mice.

glycerine(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Sweetens food, used as humectant (keeps food moist), interferes with nutrient assimilation.

glyceryl monostearate(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
An emulsifier (breaks down fats), lethal to lab rats, still under investigation by FDA.

glycine(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Non-essential amino acid used as antacid, indicates very poor quality food.

ground corn(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Is not “whole ground,” this is misleading, often indicates poor quality, can cause allergies.

fresh chicken by-products (organ meat only)(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates poor quality hidden behind “organ meat only” and “fresh” still by-products which can include diseased organ tissue.

food starch(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descript source can be from any grain, causes allergies, weight gain and poor digestion, cheap filler.

ground rice(1 stars)found in 17% of pet food products analyzed
Filler — has been linked to diabetes, always indicates white rice, not whole grain but usually floor sweepings from rice industry.

hydrochloric acid(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Corrosive ingredient used as modifier for food starch, gelatin, as a pH adjuster and conversion of corn starch to syrup.

fish oil (preserved with mixed tocopherols)(1 stars)found in 10% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive, cheap “fish” source, often rancid prior to preserving with Vitamin E (gimmicky to cover poor quality oil).

fish oil(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive type of fish can include rancid source of “throw away” catches.

dried meat by-product(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Can include tumors and diseased tissues, rancid trim pieces and innards of various animals.

iron oxide(1 stars)found in 12% of pet food products analyzed
Can be cultivated from rust!

magnesium oxide(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Has caused tumors in lab rats, antacid.

fish(1 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive, probably rancid and of poor quality. Can have high levels of mercury.

lamb by-product(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Contains everything internal but the muscle meat including diseased tissue, tumors, etc.

eucalyptus oil(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Not an essential oil meant for ingesting!

ethoxyquin (a preservative)(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
The most carcinogenic preservative, most in industry have stopped using it except very cheap, poor quality foods.

egg product(1 stars)found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap source of protein, waste product of egg industry, free of shell.

dried whey(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Can encourage allergies, cheap protein source from cow’s milk.

liver(1 stars)found in 8% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive source can include any mammal tissue, too much liver can become toxic to the body when used in dry foods, used as flavor, minimal source of iron.

L-lysine monohydrochloride(1 stars)found in 8% of pet food products analyzed
Poor source of Lysine (essential amino acid found in meat), cheaper to use for food enrichment for grain-based foods.

dried plain beet pulp(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Pure sugar filler — leads to weight gain, hyperactivity and feeds arthritis.

dried animal digest(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Flavor enhancer. Is non-descriptive, digest is rendered animal tissue, including rancid or diseased parts.

iodized salt(1 stars)found in 7% of pet food products analyzed
Used to cover rancid meats and fats, get cats to drink more – causes kidney dysfunction, hypertension.

salmon(1 stars)found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
A source of protein and fatty acids which can add mercury to the diet.

propylene glycol(1 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Adds sweetness to food, used in antifreeze! Some preservative action, possible carcinogen.

corn(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Inexpensive feed-grade can include moldy grain or fungus which has cause death.

rabbit by products(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Includes tumors, ears, carcass, etc.

red 3(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Carcinogenic color.

red 40(1 stars)found in 6% of pet food products analyzed
Artificial color, carcinogenic.

red 40 and other color(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Is a carcinogen.

rice(1 stars)found in 7% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler, can cause diabetes in dogs, often indicates poorest quality possible.

rice bran(1 stars)found in 12% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler, can lead to digestive upset.

rice flour(1 stars)found in 11% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler, causes bowel distress and can lead to diabetes in dogs.

pasta (wheat flour)(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap, gimmicky filler that can cause allergies, feeds arthritis.

rice gluten(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Can encourage diabetes, a poor protein source/filler.

corn gluten(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Highly allergenic, adds sugar, is a poor protein source, interferes with digestion.

salmon meal(1 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Concentrated source of protein and a few fatty acids (oil has been pressed out) but can add mercury to the diet.

salt(1 stars)found in 69% of pet food products analyzed
Used to cover up rancid meat and fat, can cause kidney and heart disease, hypertension — used to encourage cats to drink, source of sodium chloride.

sea salt(1 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Used to cover up rancid meat and fat, can cause kidney and heart disease, hypertension — used to encourage cats to drink, source of sodium chloride.

smoke flavor(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates flavor which can potentially become carcinogenic, retards bacteria on rancid meat.

sodium bisulfate(1 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Used as disinfectant!

sodium carbonate(1 stars)found in 11% of pet food products analyzed
Neutralizer for rancid fats, similar to lye.

sodium chloride(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Table salt — used to cover up rancid meat and fat, can cause kidney and heart disease, hypertension — used to encourage cats to drink.

sodium hexametaphosphate(1 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap source of phosphorus can become deadly to dogs — emulsifier, texturizer.

sodium nitrite (for color retention)(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Potentially highly carcinogenic.

sodium nitrite (for color retention).(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Potentially highly carcinogenic.

glycerin(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Sweetens food, used as humectant (keeps food moist), interferes with nutrient assimilation.

poultry fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols)(1 stars)found in 9% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descriptive, can be any foul, often rancid prior to preserving with Vitamin E (gimmicky, to cover poor quality fat used).

DL-alpha tocopherol acetate (1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Synthetic source, non-nutritive. Used generally as a “natural” preservative.

DL-alpha tocopherol acetate(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Synthetic source, non-nutritive.

petrolatum(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Vaseline! Mild laxative effect when ingested. Petroleum is a carcinogen.

dicalcium phosphate(1 stars)found in 26% of pet food products analyzed
Can become toxic to body — texturizer in can food.

dextrose(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Sugar, feeds cancer, causes hyperactivity, weight gain.

phosphoric acid(1 stars)found in 12% of pet food products analyzed
A sequestering agent for rendered animal fats — implies poor quality fats are used, source of phosphorous.

pork by-products(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Can contain non-human-edible parts, diseased organs and tissues, pork’s not the best meat for pets.

pork liver(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Cheapest source of flavoring, some iron, hard to digest. Liver can become toxic to the body.

poultry(1 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Can include any foul, non-descriptive, often includes diseased meat, non-human grade.

poultry by-product meal(1 stars)found in 9% of pet food products analyzed
Ground up carcasses, can include dead, diseased foul, all internal parts void of healthy meat, includes feet and beaks, concentrated.

propyl gallate and citric acid(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
Chemical preservative, can cause digestive upset, stomach irritation, deceptive adding with natural Vitamin C.

poultry fat (preserved with BHA)(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Non-descript fat, possible carcinogenic preservative.

propionic acid (a preservative)(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Potentially harmful mold inhibitor.

poultry liver(1 stars)found in 4% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap source of liver flavoring, non-descriptive, often includes diseased tissues. Can become toxic to body.

corn syrup(1 stars)found in 2% of pet food products analyzed
A “sugar” that causes diabetes, weight gain, hyperactivity, fearful behavior, ill health.

corn starch-modified(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Poor source of nutrients, protein, filler, binder.

corn starch(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Terrible filler, causes several health issues including allergies.

corn oil (preserved with TBHQ)(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
TBHQ contains petroleum-derived butane, can be carcinogenic.

powdered cellulose(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Cheap filler/source of fiber, suspected to include cardboard, causes irritable bowel problems.

powdered cellulose (11.1% source of fiber)(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Suspected to include recycled cardboard.

corn grits(1 stars)found in 5% of pet food products analyzed
Poor source of protein and carbohydrates, filler.

corn gluten meal(1 stars)found in 31% of pet food products analyzed
Waste product, cheap, non-nutritive filler but used as protein source — can cause allergies and sugar imbalance.

chicken flavors(1 stars)found in 1% of pet food products analyzed
Indicates artificial flavor which can be a carcinogen.

poultry by-products(1 stars)found in 3% of pet food products analyzed
Ground up carcasses, can include dead, diseased foul, all internal parts void of healthy meat, includes feet and beaks.

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